7 city buildings do not have wind insurance in Grand Isle

Grand Isle Insurance Hits Record Highs, 7 City Buildings Lack Wind Insurance



THIS IS WDSU NEWS AT 6:00. >> OFTEN THE FIRST PART OF THE STATE FEELS THE RAGE OF A HURRICANE, GRAND ISLE. AND NOW THE CITY IS FACED WITH A NEW, SCARY PROBLEM LIKE PEAK HURRICANE SEASON, WE’RE TALKING ABOUT INADEQUATE INSURANCE COVERAGE AND NOT JUST FOR THE RESIDENTS. >> WDSU INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER AUBREY KILLION FOUND THAT THESE 7 CITY BUILDINGS ON YOUR SCREEN RIGHT NOW DID NOT HAVE WIND INSURANCE. GRAND ISLE’S MAYOR SAYS THE CITY CAN’T AFFORD THE COST OF INSURANCE AND MAY HAVE TO DROP COVERAGE. AUBREY RECENTLY SPENT TIME ON BARFRIER ISLAND IN LOUISIANA AND SHOWS YOU THE SCARY PROBLEM. >> I’M GETTING EMOTIONAL. >> GRAND ISLE MAYOR DAVID CAMARDELL BREAKS TEAR. >> YOU’RE HELPING YOUR PEOPLE EVERY DAY, YOU KNOW THAT’S HARD. >> RIGHT NOW MAYOR CAMARDELL SAYS CITY HALL, POLICE DEPARTMENT, TOWN HALL, MULTIPLEX, MAINTENANCE BUILDING, POLICE CHIEF BUILDING AND THE BUILDING DID NOT HAVE WIND INSURANCE. THIS MEANS THERE WILL BE NO INSURANCE COMPANY CHECK TO COVER FUTURE DAMAGE TO THESE BUILDINGS FROM HURRICANE WINDS. BUILDINGS THAT STILL HAVE SERIOUS DAMAGE FROM HURRICANE IDA LAST AUGUST. >> IT’S UNREAL. >> INSURANCE RATES FOR THE TOWN ON ONE OF LOUISIANA’S MOST VULNERABLE BARRIER ISLANDS HAVE CRISP OVER THE YEARS. WDSU INVESTIGATES GOT THESE FIGURES FOR THE CITY’S FIRE AND WIND INSURANCE PREMIUMS 2017 COST NEAR $48,000. 2018 $50,000. 2019 $56,000 2020 $64,000 2021 $74,000 AND 2022 $182,000 SO BETWEEN 2017 AND 2022 THAT’S ABOUT A 300% INCREASE. >> $100,000 IS LIKE GOLD TO ME RIGHT NOW. >> ESPECIALLY SINCE CAMARDELL SAYS HIS CITY’S ENTIRE BUDGET IS ONLY $4 MILLION. AND TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, LAST AUGUST HURRICANE IDA ravaged the ISLAND, WIDESPREAD PROPERTY DAMAGE RESULTING IN A 40% DECREASE IN PROPERTY TAX REVENUES FOR THE CITY. ONE RESULT OF THIS SHORTAGE, LESS MONEY FOR THE CITY HAS CAUSED SOME PUBLIC EMPLOYEES TO PICK UP AND LEAVE. >> I HAVE THREE IN A FEW WEEKS, THREE MEN, WEEKS THAT I JUST COULDN’T AFFORD. ONE THIS MORNING HAS BEEN WITH ME FOR 24 YEARS SAID I JUST CAN’T AFFORD THE INSURANCE. >> AND IT’S NOT JUST THE CITY EMPLOYEES LEAVING >> HANGING THERE EVEN THOUGH IT’S ROUGH. I’M LIVING ON A GENERATOR >> GRAND ISLE RESIDENT DANIEL VANSLAMBROOK SAYS HE CAN’T AFFORD TO STAY. DO YOU FILL THOSE CANS WITH GENZ RIGHT NOW TO FUEL YOUR GENERATOR? >> YEAH FOR TONIGHT I TODAY $30 $40 A DAY IN GAS. >> HOW DID IT TAKE SO LONG? >> SINCE THANKSGIVING WE SHARED WITH A NEIGHBOR BUT THEY MOVED OUT. >> AS GRAND ISLE BREAKS FOR ANOTHER HURRICANE SEASON WITH NO WIND INSURANCE. CAMARDELL DESCRIBES IT AS A ROLL OF THE DICE, BUT HE SAYS HE’S DETERMINED TO KEEP GRAND ISLE ALIVE. >> IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE. IF YOU BELONG TO AMERICA YOU TAKE CARE OF YOUR PEOPLE THAT’S WHAT I DO IT IS HARD I WILL GIVE THEM MY LAST DOLLAR. >> MAYOR DAVID CAMARDELL SAYS HE’S WORKING WITH THE INSURANCE COMPANIES TRYING TO GET A LOWER RATE AND HE’S CHECKING WITH THE STATE TO SEE WHAT THEY CAN OFFER. AND I ALSO FOUND THAT THE CITY OF LAFFITE ALSO DOESN’T HAVE WIND INSURANCE ON MANY OF THEIR BUILDINGS. STAY WITH ME IN THIS DEVELOPMENT SHOP

Grand Isle Insurance Hits Record Highs, 7 City Buildings Lack Wind Insurance

It is often the first part of the state to feel the fury of a hurricane, Grand Isle. The city faces a new, dire problem as hurricane season hits. WDSU’s investigation found seven city buildings have zero wind insurance. Grand Isle’s mayor says the city can’t afford skyrocketing insurance costs. “I’m getting emotional,” said Mayor David Camardell. “Every day you help your people. It’s difficult and unrealistic.” Camardell says City Hall, the police station, community center, multiplex, maintenance building, police chief’s building and warehouse have zero wind insurance. This means there will be no check from an insurance company to cover any future damage from hurricane wind damage to these buildings. Insurance rates have skyrocketed over the years. WDSU Investigates obtained the following numbers for the city’s fire and wind insurance premiums: 2017- $47.7052018- $50.0132019-$56.0942020-$64.2462021-$74.2002022- $182,000 “A thousand dollars is like gold to me right now,” Camardell said Camardell said his city’s entire budget is only $4 million. To make matters worse, last August Hurricane Ida devastated the island, the widespread property damage resulting in a 40% reduction in property tax revenue for the city. One result of that shortage, less money for the city, is causing some public officials to up and leave. “It’s time for a change,” Camardell said. Camardel said he is working with insurance companies trying to get a lower rate and state resources.

It is often the first part of the state to feel the fury of a hurricane, Grand Isle. The city faces a new, dire problem at the height of hurricane season.

WDSU Investigates found seven city buildings have zero wind insurance.

Grand Isle’s mayor says the city can’t afford skyrocketing insurance costs.

“I’m getting emotional,” said Mayor David Camardell. “Every day you help your people. It’s hard and unreal.”

Camardelle says City Hall, the police department, the community center, the multiplex, the maintenance building, the police chief’s building and the storage building have zero wind insurance. This means there will be no check from an insurance company to cover future damage from hurricane winds to these buildings.

Insurance rates have skyrocketed over the years.

WDSU Investigates obtained the following numbers for the city’s fire and wind insurance premiums:

2017 – $47,705

2018 – $50,013

2019 – $56,094

2020 – $64,246

2021 – $74,200

2022 – $182,000

“A thousand dollars is like gold to me right now,” Camardell said

Camardel said his city’s entire budget is only $4 million.

To make matters worse, last August Hurricane Ida devastated the island, the widespread property damage resulting in a 40% reduction in property tax revenue for the city.

One result of that shortage, less money for the city, is causing some public officials to up and leave.

“It’s time for a change,” Camardell said.

Camardel said he is working with insurance companies trying to get a lower rate and state resources.